Monthly Archives: April 2017

Marrakech, last day visit to Majorelle Gardens and I can finally binge obsess about the doors I’ve seen all over Morocco

So we visited the lovely, but sadly overcrowded, Majorelle Gardens on our last day. This was where the late YSL and his partner developed a garden (which they rescued from potential oblivion) and a foundation to help local kids. In summary it is a homage to cactus, blue and yellow and has the best gift shop ever.  Last time I visited about 15 years ago it was much quieter – seems the secret’s out. 

Majorelle Gardens, Marrakech

And now for the doors – I’ve seen so many on our travels and they are symbolic as well as varied, interesting and diverse. So many places we saw in Morocco were behind doors that gave you no clue as to what was behind them – so there was always a “down the rabbit hole” feeling whenever you went through one. As a finale, rather than focussing on what was behind the doors I thought I’d celebrate the doors themselves. Below are some of my favourites from the sublime and complex to the simple yet nonetheless mesmerizing. Enjoy. 

Selection of intricate doors from around the country


Some simple and battered doors – still lovely though


Next stop – cheeky couple of days in Madrid

Morocco, Marrakech – another lovely place to rest our heads- Riad La Sultana and another day to get lost in the largest souk in the country

Marrakech is yet another city full of tiny doors that hide so much from the public eye – whether it is a shop with three floors resembling an Aladdin’s cave or the many riads in the old medina. It is not the done thing to show off what you have – hence the unobtrusive exteriors hiding the sumptuous interiors. It certainly creates an element of surprise. Ours, like most roads, has a large roof deck where breakfast is served gazing over the rooftops  of Marrakech as the muezzin calls people to prayer. 

My Fenec (desert fox) suite at Riad La Sultana


A walk around the four interconnected houses that make up Riad La Sultana

You are never short of a shopping opportunity in the old souk

Morocco, Marrakech  – finally here.

Marrakech looking its best in Spring time. 

The quieter parts of Marrakech including the madrassa and mosque and the jacaranda trees

First visit to the souk – slippers, dyers, locks and lights


Want to find something? Visit the souk. Everything from locks to slippers. 

You can even find many varieties of cacti – including a few fake ones (!) at La Mamounia Gardens. 

Cacti at La Mamounia

Morocco, Essaouira

A couple of days at the seaside in Essaouira including a Jewish shrine and synagogue and cemetery; a walk around the small medina and Harbour and some more strolling around the food market. Restful place but becoming a bit touristy. 

Olives, veggies, sweets and much much more. Food at the medina in Essaouira is a serious business

The old town in Essaouira and our trusty guide Hassan

The Haim Pinto Jewish shrine and cemetery dating back over 500 years and the synagogue in the old town

Morocco – Riad Bab Oubika, our lovely day of peace and quiet in the Atlas Mountains

Finally we had a day of rest and there is nowhere nicer to relax than in a fantasy riad nestled into the mountains. The Riad Bab Ourika fit the bill very nicely and apart from a short lesson in making a lamb terrine we did very little except read, snooze and enjoy this lovely building and its very large gardens. bliss!

At the end of our short sojourn into the mountains we headed to Essaouira via some goats in trees – yes really – see proof below. A uniquely Moroccan experience and I like the fact they are prepared to share trees.

Next stop Essaouira on the coast.

The Riad Bab Ourika, Atlas Mountains

The grounds and views from the Bab Ourika Riad

Hungry goats do indeed climb trees. But only in Morocco and only Argania trees.

Adobe everywhere, rooftops for lazing about, scenery and gardens – just another day day in the interior of Morocco

After surviving the desert sand storm, the road trip continues through Ouarzazate where we saw “Moroccowood” where everything from Lawrence of Arabia to Gladiator was filmed. And now we are spending a couple of nights of “chill time” on the top of a hill at a gorgeous Riad in the Atlas Mountains in Bab Ourika. 

Souss Massa Draa and Skoura

Ouarzazate and Al Halim


Bab Ourika

Central Morocco – Into the sahara (or desert).  

We are now in central Morocco – an area less visited than the other parts of the country. In Rissani we saw the museums and many locally made Berber carpets of all kinds (and of course I succumbed to a kilim:)

Then we headed to our desert encampment. The tents were somewhat more comfortable than the traditional Berbers use and included en-suite bathrooms! What we didn’t expect was a major sandstorm which started as we travelled up the dunes at sunset on our sturdy camels. The speed with which the wind – and therefore the sand – whips up is quite scary. Visibility can vanish very fast. It wasn’t something we thought we’d experience but it certainly gives a bit of an understanding of how hard living in the desert must be.

Carpets, museums and a desert rose (made naturally from sand)

Our desert camp and the warm welcome on arrival. T at top of sand dune imitating a T!

No doubt that without camels in the desert you are “stuffed”. We need a few more lessons in tying headscarves but not bad effort and avoided sand in mouth – mostly.